Rejuvenate

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Before it turned chilly, I power-washed a couple years of accumulated grime and algae from the siding of our house, drive, and landscaping blocks. It amounted to long hours of standing, aiming the wand, thinking and listening.

The word “rejuvenate” looped in my mind every day I worked.

I heard it as a positive, not from a tone of admonition, as in “How did you let that grime get there?”, or “This is the natural consequence of aging and time.”

No, the word “rejuvenate” was enveloped in a whisper of hope and promise, as in “Do you expect this newness of me?”, or “I am reminding you to look forward to becoming ‘like new; that’s what I do because that’s who I am.”

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Rejuvenate. A verb (used with object), re·ju·ve·nat·ed, re·ju·ve·nat·ing.

To make young again; restore to youthful vigor, appearance, etc.:That vacation has certainly rejuvenated him.
to restore to a former state; make fresh or new again:to rejuvenate an old sofa.

Physical Geography.

  1. to renew the activity, erosive power, etc., of (a stream) by uplift or by removal of a barrier in the stream bed.
  2. to impress again the characters of youthful topography on (a region) by the action of rejuvenated streams.

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Psalm 103

Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits, who forgives all your iniquity, who heals all your diseases, who redeems your life from the pit, who crowns you with steadfast love and mercy, who satisfies you with good so that your youth is renewed like the eagle’s. …

Like The Eagles

(The feature photo above was taken by Kris Sundelius Lundine.)

There are a record number of eagles wintering along the Mississippi River in the Midwest this year. They were forced to migrate when ice coverage in northern states blocked access to their major food source. They benefit from the locks and dams in this area, where turbulent waters are free of ice and plentiful with stunned gizzard shad.

eagles in trees for blog

A friend and I ventured out recently in hopes of viewing a few of the regal birds. Happily, we discovered dozens inhabiting one section of the river. We counted 75 eagles perched in the dense trees of a small island, and witnessed fish being snagged from the frigid water by strong, agile talons. My friend pointed out the pairings; the brief separations when one eagle circled the area before returning to its mate.

As we were leaving, a third of the eagles lifted from their perches and filled the sky overhead. Their soaring was majestic, their individual and collective statement stunning.

 

No wonder David used eagles as an example of eminence in Psalm 103: 2Praise the Lord, my soul, and forget not all his benefits— 3who forgives all your sins and heals all your diseases, 4who redeems your life from the pit and crowns you with love and compassion, 5who satisfies your desires with good things so that your youth is renewed like the eagle’s.

And in Isaiah 40:31, Isaiah wrote: But those who hope in the LORD will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.